Statistics for Life

One of the most common questions I get about the GSM from prospective students is ‘What are the Professors like?’ My first response is that I don’t have a clue since I don’t go to class. (Just kidding guys, Stay In School Kids!) The real answer I actually give to those unable to escape my very long tirade, including those of you reading here, involve a certain Math Professor here at the GSM. Meet Professor Chih-Ling Tsai.


Prof Tsai

Professor Tsai teaches the much esteemed Statistics 203B, or Stats 2/Stats Too!/Stats Dos for short. This is an elective available to students during the winter quarter and is a continuation of building skills learned on statistical modelling. Professor Tsai himself is a very energetic old gentleman who emphasizes that he is not here to teach statistics and is instead here to teach you about life. If you think that that makes absolutely no sense, you are most certainly in the same boat as I was in the beginning of the quarter. But that’s before I got to know the guy. Professor Tsai enjoys practicing Tai Chi in the mornings and will often teach his students when they are stressed out. He’s always happy to meet with students in his office and to lend out his vast library of books across all sorts of intellectual genres. And during class times, there is always a story to be shared about how statistics can relate to life whether personally or professionally.

My own experience was an interesting one. First of all, I was out of the country over break and missed the first class. I also showed up to class 5 minutes late for the second one. Dr. Tsai did not approve. He enthusiastically explained that my slacking ways would not pay off in life and that I must put effort into every aspect of school and work. Fast forward to the first group homework and below is an actual picture of me:

Li

Needless to say, I started off on the wrong foot. However, by going to class (on time) and seeing the Professor’s enthusiasm, I decided to put the effort in for the course. I went to office hours almost every week and rallied my teammates to collaborate on the homework assignments. I was able to manage my time and put my best foot forward. I ended up with an A- in the class which I had never thought I would achieve considering how awful I am at math. This just goes to show that passionate teachers inspire students to be passionate about the subject.

Blogpost by Li Meng (Class of 2016)

 

 

My Experience at GSM – International Study Trip

eliz

During spring break, I went to Switzerland as part of my International Study Trip class. In a size of 35 people, this group started from Zurich, Basel, crossed the country’s capital city Bern, and then ended up at the International organizational hub, Geneva.

During the five-day week, we visited companies and organizations like Novartis, International Red Cross, CERN, the United Nations, Zurich University, etc. At Swiss Re, an insurance company, we understood Switzerland’s competency as a financial center. At Novartis, a Fortune 500 public company, we saw how much effort they had made to attract and retain talents. At MudiPharma, a private pharmaceutical company, this group was inspired by the Greek CEO and his leadership philosophy. On non-profitable side, we gained a deeper understanding on humanity at International Red Cross. We learned the cutting-edge particle research at CERN. From the political perspective, diplomats at US Embassy provided their view of this world, and the mayor of Nyon, a small local city, shared their social service practice.

Switzerland has been a window through which I see the difference between the Europe and the US. Accordingly, business marketing practices in Europe should be different from in the US. As a memo for my international marketing practice in CPG (Consumer Package Goods) industry, below is my summary of my observations on the European market.

1) Customer profile

Language is the first element that contribute to the diversity on this continent. Namely, German, French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, and many more. In Switzerland alone, four official languages are mixed with many different regional dialects.

Psychographically, consumers in Europe are highly educated. They work hard but also value family life. People in regions like Switzerland, Germany, Northern Italy and UK work like an engine, leading the prosperity of the European economy. These individuals are independent and confident. They form their opinions and make choices through their own study and research. People in the US and China are more likely to be influenced by words-of-mouth and pop culture. This assumption in difference may lead to a quantitative study on the effectiveness of social media marketing campaign in the Europe. Presumably, the fabulous ROI (Return-On-Investment) of a social media campaign in the US is hard to be duplicated in the Europe.

Europe is not an integrated market, even though the formation of EU (European Union) creates congruencies. It is just as diverse as the US if not more. European countries’ histories are intertwined all together. This has developed the similarity of the customers’ profiles of different countries. However, representing different parties in those historical events, different European countries are also dissimilar to each other. For example, Italian consumers are more likely to be price sensitive than Swiss. French consumers are more likely to be attracted to a prestige brand and style whereas German consumers are probably more interested in accuracy and functionality. The dissimilarity challenges the effectiveness of a uniformed marketing communication package on this continent.

2) Positioning

Each customer segment in Europe is not extraordinarily large in size. This makes it hard for companies in Europe to have a cost benefit through commercialization. However, individual customers there are valuable because their LTV (Life Time Value) is high. The high-level income determines their consumption. Their relatively high brand loyalty is the other contributor. Fewer bounces between different brands allows companies to reduce the advertising expenditure while maintaining a stable customer base and top-line sales.

Given the customer’s characteristics in the European market, differentiation becomes the key to serve each niche segment. While companies in the US and emerging markets can be a cost leader by leveraging the economy of scale, a business in Europe should strategize to serve a well-defined customer cluster with a highly differentiated product. The target customers’ profile and their needs should be clear. The product should solve the specific problem and be superior to other substitutes.

In marketing practice, branding is a subject worth focusing on. Themes such as quality, legacy, prestige, fashion, luxury, should be the messages to the target customers to create value that resonates with them.

A potential challenge for branding is localization. Countries like Switzerland do not have many resources. Their commercial goods mainly depend on import. On the other hand, the small population makes Switzerland a small market in which a cost-leadership company can hardly survive. Swiss residents know how difficult to run a local business, so they strongly support local businesses. As a result, this put an international company in Switzerland at risk if the company simply attempt the same strategy with the global market without a localized image. A brand actively interacting with the local community is likely to be more reputable than those burning money on advertising.

3) External Environment

Besides the customers, the regulatory and political situation also have shaped the landscape of this market. The EU plays a significant role in terms of integrating the market. However, it is a controversial organization. Many countries are still not participating and do not even plan to participate in the future, especially, Switzerland. Additionally, many questions remain. How will the EU system work in the future, how much impact will it have and to what extent will it pull Europe together are questionable?

Let’s put the EU aside. As independent political entities, European countries are not equally attractive to investors.

Among the best investment destinations, Switzerland stands out. Its low corporate tax rate makes it an optimal location for business headquarters. The easy access to its reputed banking industry is another appeal. In addition, its neutrality and independency create the stability to allow businesses to operate in peace. While CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) has become a hot topic, Switzerland promotes the opportunities better than any other areas in the world for businesses to go beyond the scope of profitability. NGOs (Non-Government Organizations) in Switzerland create an atmosphere for businesses or even individuals to think big and perform well while doing good.

To a great extent, all these elements help to offset the disadvantage of the high labor cost in this county.

To summarize, Europe is an attractive and unique market. Marketing in Europe is a complex business practice. As a marketer, you may want to ponder: How strong the brand image is locally? Who are your collaborators? Will they help you to better understand the local market? To what extent can you be adaptive to integrate into the local community? All this must be done before you make a move into this market.

Blogpost by Elizabeth Liu – Class of 2016

 

So You’ve Been Accepted…Now What?:

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First and foremost, congratulations are in order. You’ve been granted the opportunity to earn a degree only 2% of the population holds. Perhaps more interesting is the fact that many of you will also be getting your first summer vacation in years.

Taking time off between working and starting business school is a great way to reintegrate yourself to the student mindset. The prospect of having 4 classes with one lecture a week may make b-school seem like an extended vacation. While the daily grind of a 9-5 or an insane 80-hour work week may be on hold for the next two years, don’t let your new schedule fool you. While deceptively bare on the calendar, your days WILL fill up fast. Group meetings for assignments, the internship hunt, networking events, involvement in clubs, and general life will take over. Soon you’ll be wondering where all that free time you thought you would have went. So before you get bogged down in the nitty-gritty of school life, take some time to get a jump-start (or refresher if it’s been awhile) over the summer.

I know I said summer was for that vacation you’ve been putting off for years, and it is. Take trips, catch up with old friends, spend time with your family, and refresh yourself from being burned out by work. These are the most important things you can do to get your mind fresh for the next chapter. However, there are a few side tasks that are easier to get under your belt before you start school. Below is some advice I wish I had before coming back as student2.0.

  1. Get acquainted with excel! Being comfortable working with hundreds of rows of data will save you hours down the road. This includes everything from the basic shortcuts (like highlighting up to the last cell of data without the entire column), to slightly more advanced equation rules (like when to use ($) in formulas).
  2. Get your LinkedIn page up to speed. Before you get to school update your profile to include your candidacy. This will help you find alumni connections, set up informational interviews, and start the internship hunt. Getting your internship locked in as soon as possible will save you untold amounts of stress. Do not wait to start reaching out and creating those relationships.
  3. Refresh your statistics acumen. You don’t need to take a whole summer course, but do make a conscious effort to re-learn what a p-value is from your freshman year of college (or maybe high school for some of you). The basics of statistics will pop up in a variety of classes, from marketing to operations, and you won’t want to spend hours on Google trying to re-learn it just to finish your homework.
  4. Devote time just for thinking. You already wrote your application essay that most likely asked your future goals. And you most likely danced around and threw in a bunch of jargon-of-the-day verbiage to sound like you had it figured out. We all know you don’t. And that’s ok; the good news is you’re in! Now you have some time to actually sit down and figure out what that roadmap is to your dream job. Don’t just identify what company you want to work for and go back to sitting by the pool. Really figure out what types of tasks motivate you, what roles you enjoy being in, what skills you have that cover multiple positions and across industries. This may sound like fluff, but the basis of these conversations with yourself will come up in the job search, networking, and, most importantly, interviews. So sit down and come up with some actual answers…and the great news is you can do this at the pool.

Blog by Karen Mesrobian – Class of 2016

Most wonderful time of the year

UC Davis MBA Ambassador

The halls of the GSM are filled with a nervous excitement as the internship-hunting season is in full swing. With some classmates getting positions early at Intel, Wells Fargo, and other great companies, the bulk of internship interviews and hiring are happening as I write this. So, the question that is on the forefront of the mind of every future intern is, “How do I get the right internship for me?”

Excellent question, young padawan. First and foremost, figure out what sector you are looking to get experience and what role in that sector fits your skills, likes, desires, etc. Not every internship is right for everyone, and the worst thing someone can do is to accept an internship that is totally outside what you know you want to do (Example: Don’t go into Investment Banking if you want to be in tech marketing.) Next, leverage your networks, from everyone to prior coworkers and family friends to GSM Alumni and the Career Development team at the GSM. The key to getting an internship that makes you excited falls into two categories: Getting the Interview and Crushing the Interview. Your resumes, connections, that alignment of the stars, all work to get you in the door. Crushing that interview is on you. Be the best, most polished, likeable, and intelligent version of yourself you can be. Dress for success. Basically, do what the Career Development team tells you to do at an interview. (The GSM has great training and prep opportunities for students.)

Some subtle keys to success fall in that murky area between your ears. Trust yourself; know that you belong with the top-level companies in the best positions. Don’t let others talking about their success intimidate or stress you. As the saying goes around here: Everyone who wants an internship gets one. All good things in their own time. Internships are like playing house. They are for trying out a role that you think you will like, mostly to give yourself some perspective for that looming career decision after graduation. Happy hunting, future interns. You are going to crush it.

Blog by Jim Terheyden – Class of 2016

Imagining the school as your company

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One of the most awesome things about UC Davis is that the school identity is literally what you make of it.  We have roughly 50 people in each of our graduating classes, each with different goals, interests, skills, and talents.  In our school, we’ve been given a blank slate to play with – a sandbox where your experience is what you make of it, and you can find fit yourself into the broader picture however you like.

I encourage our new applicants to consider what kinds of things you like to do in a professional organization before you start class.  Are you outward-facing?  Do you lead teams through breadth of knowledge or do you prefer to be the resident subject-matter-expert?  What is one thing that you wish you could practice?

With these answers, seek out opportunities in school to explore your professional development.  Try your hand at handling a marketing campaign.  Make organizational processes more efficient.  Find outside partnerships and negotiate deal terms.  If you view the school as the company you work for, the effort will directly translate into real-world experience.  Your internship or full-time job interview will be a snap – “practiced initiative” is music to a recruiter’s ears.

The most rewarding part about this attitude is that the work you put into the school – in addition to training you for success – leaves the organization in better shape than you found it.  You’re paying your whole alumni network back by making our school even better than before.

We appreciate it, and you will too.

Blog by Chris Darbyshire – Class of 2015

Take some time to explore Davis after your GSM visit

One of the most important factors for me when applying to business school was the location. As far as college towns go — Davis is a gem.

After my class visit at the GSM, one of the things I wish I had done was explore the town a little more. Choosing a graduate school is a big deal, especially deciding where you want to live for the next two years. So my advice to anyone planning to visit the GSM, is to tour Davis too. Here are my pro-tips for things to do in Davis after your class visit or interview.

1. Stroll through Downtown Davis. Located an easy walk or bike ride from the Gallagher Hall, Downtown Davis is lively and full of all the usual college town amenities – bars, restaurants, night clubs, coffee shops, and shopping.

2. Ride a bike. Davis is an amazing town for bike riding. There are miles of bike trails that crisscross the city, designated bike paths, and beautiful scenery. If you can’t bring your own bike, there are several shops in town that will rent bikes by the hour. Be sure to ride the 12-mile Davis bike loop that takes you around the entire town.

Here’s map of some of the bike loops you can enjoy.

ucdmap

And check out this cool time-lapse video of a guy riding the whole loop. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkDguVJH9FE

3. Explore the UC Davis Arboretum. 100 acres of beautiful gardens for active recreation or peaceful contemplation, and plant collections from all over the world. Ride your bike around the Arboretum loop, take a stroll, learn about some plants, or feed some ducks. Just remember to take your allergy medicine in the spring.

Keep an eye out for the biggest cactus I’ve ever seen. It’s HUGE!

cactus

4. Grab a drink at a bar downtown. Downtown Davis has everything for everyone who likes to imbibe – beer bars, cocktail bars, wine bars. Get a taste of the local flavor at G Street Wonderbar. Order a Moscow Mule and play The Simpsons arcade game. I promise you won’t be disappointed.

 5Enjoy the City Park farmer’s market. Every Wednesday evening and there is an excellent farmer’s market with vendors selling locally grown fruits and veggies, cheeses, meats, and crafts. See live music from spring through fall. It’s a great place to take a group of friends, chill on a blanket, eat some food, and enjoy the great Davis weather. If you plan your class visit for a Wednesday, you should NOT miss the farmers market.

6Visit the Rhustaller Farm and Yard. E. Paino is a GSM alumnus who’s brewing and selling incredible craft beers just a couple of miles outside Davis. The Rhustaller Farm & Yard won’t be open again until March 20th, but if you can’t wait that long you can visit their tap room in downtown Sacramento.

http://ruhstallerbeer.com/ruhstaller-farm-and-yard/

brewery

 

Blog by Rachel Peri – Class of 2015

Frequently Asked Questions

Blog by Christine

As a student Ambassador in my second year of b-school, I get asked a lot of questions. From responding to email inquiries from around the world, to hosting the casual visitor during class, to having lunch with nervous prospective students right before their big interviews with Earl, I can safely say I’ve heard it all.

As such, I’ll try to answer some FAQs for anyone considering the UC Davis Graduate School of Management as their future home. Below are my personal answers to the most common questions we get asked by visiting students:

 Why did you choose UC Davis?

I personally chose UC Davis for a number of reasons. The biggest one was cultural fit. I knew immediately after visiting the GSM that its inviting, collaborative atmosphere would be conducive to my learning and development. Everyone I met was so friendly and open to my questions. I had an immediate sense of belonging that I didn’t get from visiting other campuses. My advice to others is to visit the schools you are interested in and see what feels right for you. (Check out this blog post by Chris for tips on getting the most out of your visit to the GSM.)

I also chose the GSM due to its vicinity to the Bay Area. My area of professional interest is in e-commerce, so being close to San Francisco and Silicon Valley was critical for me. My family is also based out of the Bay Area, so that was also a major factor in my decision.

How diverse is the GSM?

A surprising number of prospective students have asked me this question, and it’s always a fun one for me to answer because we are diverse in so many ways. I’ll do my best to cover the main areas where diversity is key.

In terms of ethnic/racial diversity, our student body represents 12 countries, with 20 languages spoken. Each class has roughly 40% international students, which really enables us to learn so much more from each other, as our experiences are varied in many ways and collaboration is key in b-school.

Women make up a big part of the GSM as well. Over 40% of our faculty and staff are women – that is among the highest percentage at top global business schools. Our student body ranges from 30-40% female as well, and our Women in Leadership club is very active.

We’re also ranked #1 by The Economist for the diversity of recruiters and industry sectors that provide career opportunities for our grads. We represent a diversity of industries and job functions, which you can learn more about here.

The GSM prides itself on the fact that our students are not “cookie cutter” MBAs – we really are a diverse group, and we like it that way. Visit our admissions page for even more info on diversity at the GSM.

  1. How do I prepare for my admissions interview?

Lucky for you, I’ve already written a blog post on this subject! Click here to learn what to wear, what the team is looking for in future students, and more. You’re welcome.

What is the work-life balance like in business school?

The answer to this question is different for everyone. Some of my classmates have young children, many of us are married. In fact, during my first year, I was planning a wedding on top of my school responsibilities, involvement in clubs, and internship search. As you can imagine, it was a lot of work! It can be overwhelming, but in general I was very comfortable with my work-life balance and found plenty of opportunities to have fun and blow off steam. This year, I’m on the board of three clubs and taking a full load of classes, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

So there you have it! There are of course many, many more questions, but I hope this helps answer some of your burning questions about the GSM and business school in general.

Blog by Christine Bolghand – Class of 2015

We Are Group!

Li Meng Blog

Group projects are the worst aren’t they? Remember back in undergrad when you always got put with the worst teammates? There was always one person that was only able to meet at 6:00am every other Saturday. Then there was the member who wanted the entire financial analysis project to be about cats and would argue if you disagreed in the slightest. And lastly, my favorite, the one who never showed up. Ever. Fortunately, I can tell you that has not even been close to my experience at the GSM.

Even before classes start, bright eyed GSMers are assigned to teams in order to participate in real, live case competitions organized by Fortune 500 companies. This is the first opportunity to get to know our classmates and how they perform in group situations. From the first day of most core classes in the fall, groups are either assigned or selected by students here in the Davis MBA program. Whether matched up with random teammates or ones you decide, the experience will always be a positive one. With a random group in Articulation and Critical Thinking, I was matched up with classmates I had not worked with before and very much enjoyed learning about their past experiences and varied viewpoints on the topics at hand.

 

group

For Statistics, we were allowed to form our own groups and I managed to join an all-star team of 4 eclectic individuals. Though we all came from different backgrounds and industries, we all came together and contributed equally to the challenging projects we were faced with. From the beginning, we spent much time given each other nicknames and pasting funny pictures into a shared Google doc. However, every member’s drive and own brand of humor propelled us to do great work for the projects and the class in general. The food we brought for each meeting certainly did not dampen our spirits.

I hope you are as excited as I am to be working with peers here at the UC Davis MBA and hope that this blurb eased your doubts about group projects at the MBA level a bit. Just remember to bring snacks!

pizza

 

Blog by Li Meng – Class of 2016

“You’re Doing It All Wrong”

Mackenzie's blog

I am writing from the other side. That’s right. I made it. Graduated. Took that MBA bull by the horns and held on tight for two years until the program flung me violently off into the real world – and into my dream job. But that’s beside the point.

After rewarding myself with vacations to Hawaii, Nepal, and Australia along with some much needed relaxation after the grueling and incredible MBA program at Davis, I finally could get some distance and look back at my experience. And I am writing to tell everyone who is lucky enough to still be there that you are doing it all wrong.

Don’t skip class. Seriously, about half of the math nerds in there have done the calculation for how much we are paying for every 15 minutes in the classroom and you don’t want to think about how much you are throwing down the drain if you skip a single one. (Note: I skipped a grand total of 8.) And when you are there, pay attention. Shut the laptop once in a while and take notes by hand. Do whatever you have to do to really listen. There isn’t a single day that goes by that I don’t wish I could pull exactly what my professor said in Strategy out of my sleeve in a meeting, and dear me, I would give anything to go back and master accounting (it is the key to everything in business). And definitely take classes outside your discipline. Make yourself as valuable as you can in your future.

Oh, and while you are at it, please network more. I had an informational interview schedule of at least one every two weeks. I wish I had done three a week minimum. That “MBA halo” doesn’t last forever – and you wouldn’t believe the people you can get to sit down with you while you are in the program.

Now, definitely join a club. Join three! Attend to a club event. Make a difference in your school community. Help set up for an event. Also, make sure you play IM sports – or if that’s not your thing – go cheer on your awesome GSM classmates in the big game. Make a sign! (ASM has all the supplies in the clubroom…)

And play way more. Have a beer with your friends after class. Or red wine, if that’s your druthers. Enjoy the student lifestyle; I can promise you it does not last forever, for better and for worse.

I think what I am saying is: you are probably doing some of this and doing it really well. Do more. You are here for so many reasons – to get a job, to jumpstart your professional life, to meet likeminded motivated individuals, to have unforgettable experiences. You are not actually doing it all wrong, but I guarantee you that you are not taking advantage of all the amazing opportunities that you have in front of you right now.

So, you’re not doing it all wrong at all. You’re doing great. Be present, work hard, and have fun. You’ll be amazed where you end up. I promise.

“Dress (and Research) for Success”

I tapped my toes nervously in the waiting room outside the office where I would shortly be having my interview. I looked down and saw I was wearing neon green spandex running tights, a loose button up shirt, and my slightly scuffed running shoes.

What might have been a nightmare for almost anyone else (equivalent to realizing you went to the interview in your underwear), just reminded me of how thankful I was for the sweat-wicking properties of my interview outfit at that moment.

“Mackenzie?” My interviewer at one of the USA’s major sporting brands stuck her head out of the room. She had a sporty ponytail atop her head hinting she may have gone running that morning and was wearing (similar to my outfit) running tights and a baggy sweater. As I got up and walked through the door into her office, she said with a smile, “Nice tights! You look like you already work here.”

A week later I was suited up head to toe in the most classic corporate America interview wear possible interviewing for a job at a top level insurance company.

While these are two extremes on the spectrum, the lesson is applicable everywhere. Know your industry and know the company culture where you are going to be interviewing. Some more granola or sports oriented companies won’t even consider you if you come dressed in a full suit (“S/he just wouldn’t fit the culture”). Others it would be a seriously bad decision to wear neon green of any kind in the interview.

Before an interview, you should be researching your company extensively online (probably set up Google alerts to know of any recent news), but also talk to as many people as you can who have contact with the culture (second years and peers who have already interviewed, alumni who work in the company, and more).

You only have one chance for a first impression – dress, and research, for success!

Blog by Mackenzie Guinon – Class of 2014

NOM NOM NOM!

NOM NOM NOM

UC Davis is world renowned for its expertise in the agriculture industry.  This is one of the main reasons I chose to attend the MBA program here.  Food and cooking have always been passions of mine which have turned into a desire to launch a career in the agribusiness sector.  As students at the Graduate School of Management (GSM), we have access to the latest advancements and cutting edge technology in the food and beverage world.  Speakers often visit giving talks about what the future holds in this challenging but ever important mission to grow crops.  I knew I would be surrounded by a bunch of “Aggies” here in Davis and couldn’t wait to soak up all the information available.  What I didn’t realize was that my education would expand beyond agribusiness into an exciting world of cultural cuisine.

Although our full-time MBA program has 45 students, we are an extremely diverse group.  Which brings me to the meat and potatoes of this posting.  After just one quarter in Davis I have been introduced to all kinds of delicious new recipes and cooking styles.  In October, a few of my classmates from India invited us all over for a traditional meal.  All we had to do was provide drinks and silverware and they took care of the rest.  We arrived to a feast of dishes prepared to perfection by Rahul, Zalak, Sriram, and Gaanesh (All Class of 2016).  The air was filled by the smell of Daal, Chana Masala, Zeera rice, Gulab Zamun, Papad, Rotis, and Raita.  An even more formal gathering was arranged soon after called the Diwali Festival.  This included traditional Indian food along with Indian dances and games.

Later in October it was time to head east to the Philippines.  This meal featured small pork rolls called lumpia that I think I could eat for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.  NOM!  Filipino night also included pancit bihon which we washed down with some calamnsi juice.  Soon after we ventured north to the Sichuan Province in China.  Luckily my roommate Elizabeth Liu(AKA Mother Liu Class of 2016) toned down the spices so that our American taste buds could live to see another burger.  Sichuan night was unforgettable because the food never stopped coming!  Double cooked pork, Ma Po Tofu, mushroom stew, cucumber salad, stir fried pork, kung pao chicken…you get the picture.  We ate for dayssss.  Literally though, we were eating some of the leftovers 4 days later.

Sichuan night was such a hit that we had to do another round of Chinese cuisine.  We switched it up and wandered to Northern China with the Meng Dynasty (Li Meng class of 2016).  Peking duck, dumplings, Nu Rou, shrimp stir, and green bean stew were prepared flawlessly.

I would be foolish not to include the largest feast of the first quarter, Thanksgiving.  This was not just any Thanksgiving feast.  It was a giant potluck that brought together full- time MBA, part- time MBA, and Masters of Accounting students.  For many international students this was their first Thanksgiving and the requirement was to contribute any dish you may serve at a large holiday meal.  All the classics were present including turkey, gravy, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie, and stuffing.  But as you meandered along the feeding tables there were many new additions that provided exciting flavors.

I am now far too hungry to continue writing about the mouthwatering meals we MBA students have shared together.  It has been a wonderful surprise being able to experience so many authentic cultural cooking styles in such a short period of time.  But really the most important aspect of this unexpected education has been the ability to bond with classmates.  Simply being around one another away from the classroom setting really allows you to get to know the people sitting all around you during that Financial Accounting course.  Food has a way of bringing people together and here at the GSM we couldn’t agree more.  This quarter we will be continuing our world travels to my roots in Portugal when we cook up linguica, morcela/blood sausage, and a splash of tawny port to cap it off.  NOM NOM NOM!

Blog by Jeff Ornellas – Class of 2016